Say Goodbye to Discovery.

Aug 18

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.

Aug 18

spaceplasma:

Millisecond Pulsars

As the name suggestions, millisecond pulsars have pulse periods that are in the range from one to ten milliseconds. Most such millisecond pulsars are found in binary systems, typically with white-dwarf companions. These pulsars are highly magnetized, old neutron stars in binary systems which have been spun up to high rotational frequencies by accumulating mass and angular momentum from a companion star. Neutron stars form when a massive star explodes at the end of its life and leaves behind a super-dense, spinning ball of neutrons. A pulsar is the same thing as a neutron star, but with one added feature. Pulsars emit lighthouse-like beams of x-ray and radio waves that rapidly sweep through space as the object spins on its axis. Most pulsars rotate just a few times per second, but some spin hundreds of times faster. These millisecond pulsars are the fastest-rotating stars we know of.

  • To hear the sound of a pulsar, click here

Credit: NASA

(via science-and-logic)

"Heroes in the history of science come and go, but one thing is certain, Ampere’s name will always be current."

- Dr. David Goodstein

Aug 16

"In his short and magnificent 1940 book A Mathematician’s Apology, the English mathematician G.H. Hardy draws attention to the fact that a theorem cannot be undone. Mathematics is the only science that deals with truth, something that can be demonstrated by popping into any library: mathematical literature is evergreen, while texts on other sciences become rapidly obsolete. Two thousand years have not written a wrinkle on the Pythagorean theorem. Nobody studies Ptolemy’s solar system, except out of historical interest, but Euclid is still standing. Mathematics works by accumulation, not substitution."

- Artur has a problem | piauí_95 [revista piauí] pra quem tem um clique a mais (via darkuncle)

Traveler,

If you seek truth, look no further. Mathematics welcomes you.

(via mathematica)

Aug 15
Aug 15

laboratoryequipment:

Harvard Creates Robot Flash Mob

The first 1,000-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard Univ.

“Form a sea-star shape,” directs a computer scientist, sending the command to 1,024 little ’bots simultaneously via an infrared light. The robots begin to blink at one another, and then gradually arrange themselves into a five-pointed star. “Now form the letter K.”

The “K” stands for Kilobots, the name given to these extremely simple robots, each just a few centimeters across, standing on three pinlike legs. Instead of one highly complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/08/harvard-creates-robot-flash-mob

Incredible.

we-are-star-stuff:

"Dr. King’s policy was that non-violence would achieve the gains for black people in the United States. His major assumption was that if you are non-violent, if you suffer, your opponent will see your suffering and will be moved to change his heart. That’s very good.
He only made one fallacious assumption: In order for non-violence to work, your opponent must have a conscience. The United States has none.” [x]
Aug 14

we-are-star-stuff:

"Dr. King’s policy was that non-violence would achieve the gains for black people in the United States. His major assumption was that if you are non-violent, if you suffer, your opponent will see your suffering and will be moved to change his heart. That’s very good.

He only made one fallacious assumption: In order for non-violence to work, your opponent must have a conscience. The United States has none.” [x]

(via cosmicrot)